Tweets by @DanielRyan0777 Megacosm
A blog mainly about our world and our universe and the lenses we use to uncover their mysteries: science, reason, and imagination--with random music, thoughts, and poetry thrown in as well for good measure.
8bitfuture:

This is the sunshield on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope.
This test unit was unfurled to full-size for the first time last week and “worked perfectly”, according to NASA.

The Sunshield is about the length of a tennis court, and will be folded up like an umbrella around the Webb telescope’s mirrors and instruments during launch. Once it reaches its orbit, the Webb telescope will receive a command from Earth to unfold, and separate the Sunshield’s five layers into their precisely stacked arrangement with its kite-like shape.
The Sunshield test unit was stacked and expanded at a cleanroom in the Northrop Grumman facility in Redondo Beach, California.
The Sunshield separates the observatory into a warm sun-facing side and a cold side where the sunshine is blocked from interfering with the sensitive infrared instruments. The infrared instruments need to be kept very cold (under 50 K or -370 degrees F) to operate.   The Sunshield protects these sensitive instruments with an effective sun protection factor or SPF of 1,000,000 (suntan lotion generally has an SPF of 8-50).
In addition to providing a cold environment, the Sunshield provides a thermally stable environment. This stability is essential to maintaining proper alignment of the primary mirror segments as the telescope changes its orientation to the sun.

I’m challenging myself to read 700 pages today, finishing three books. 

(Source: megacosms)

earthandanimals:

Tiny Blue-tailed Western Skink
Source
astronomynerd:

Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 Image Credit & Copyright: John Davis
Explanation: A gaze across a cosmic skyscape, this telescopic mosaic reveals the continuous beauty of things that are. The evocative scene spans some 6 degrees or 12 Full Moons in planet Earth’s sky. At the left, folds of red, glowing gas are a small part of an immense, 300 light-year wide arc. Known as Barnard’s loop, the structure is too faint to be seen with the eye, shaped by long gone supernova explosions and the winds from massive stars, and still traced by the light of hydrogen atoms. Barnard’s loop lies about 1,500 light-years away roughly centered on the Great Orion Nebula, a stellar nursery along the edge of Orion’s molecular clouds. But beyond lie other fertile star fields in the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. At the right, the long-exposure composite finds NGC 2170, a dusty complex of nebulae near a neighboring molecular cloud some 2,400 light-years distant.
    When you’re young your reality is accepted by most. When you’re older, your reality changes and that seems to upset most people.
mapsontheweb:

The Historic Distribution of Coffea aribica